Highland Animal Hospital
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Monday–Friday, 7am–6pm |  Saturday, 9:30am–1:00pm | Sunday, 11am-noon

Dog Vaccination


Effective Pet Vaccinations in St Paul, MN

Protect your pet from harm and prevent them from getting dangerous illnesses with the help of Highland Animal Hospital. At our clinic, we offer several pet vaccinations in St. Paul, MN, that are proven to prevent dangerous illnesses which could shorten the life of your furry family member. 

The vaccination treatments we offer are effective at preventing many of the harmful diseases that pets are most vulnerable to. We focus on providing immunizations for infections that are common to Minnesota and offer special treatments when you need to cover a broader area. Our veterinarian will work with you to develop a vaccination schedule and will explain each shot your pet needs and why they are essential.


General Vaccine Information

Both kittens and puppies need yearly vaccines starting at 6-8 weeks old with some treatments requiring multiple shots. If your pet has never received an animal vaccination, it is imperative that you bring them to our clinic right away, especially if they are older than 16 weeks. This way, you know that your puppy or kitten is safe from the risks of common diseases such as rabies and Lyme disease. 

At our clinic, we understand that cats and dogs need different treatment plans and offer immunizations to cover both. For puppies they typically need shots for:

Distemper | Measles | Parainfluenza | Bordetella | DHPP | Coronavirus | Leptospirosis | Lyme Disease | Rabies | Giardia

While kittens typically need fewer shots than a puppy, our vet team will still ensure they receive the right shots. Some common pet immunizations your cat will need include:

FVRCP | FELV | Rabies | FeLv/FIV

Vet with Dog in St. Paul, MN

Immunizing Your Four-Legged Family Members

Most vaccines typically work by tricking your pet’s body into thinking it has the virus we are treating against. This causes their immune system to build up a natural resistance to the disease, preventing the real infection from taking hold. By taking a proactive approach to preventing the spread of illness to your pet, you will greatly increase the chance that they will live a long and healthy life with your family. Additionally, certain diseases, such as rabies, can spread between animals and pets, giving an even greater reason to seek pet vaccinations.

Are Yearly Vaccines Safe?

While there has been a lot of press lately about the dangers of vaccines, the benefits of immunizing your pet still far outweigh the risks.  The majority of cats and dogs will respond normally to the vaccine, with adverse reactions being extremely rare. Additionally, the vaccines we use have been thoroughly tested by multiple organizations and are safe for use in both humans and animals. This is why immunizing your pet is still one of the best ways to significantly extend their lifespan while greatly improving their quality of life.

Contact us to learn more about vaccinating your pets. We proudly serve St. Paul, MN, and the surrounding areas.


Dog Vaccines 

Canine Distemper (DHLPP-C)
The canine distemper vaccine used here is a combination of 6 different viral and bacterial vaccines. The agents vaccinated against are responsible for diseases of the brain, lungs, liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal tract. We recommend an initial series of three shots beginning at 8 weeks of age with 3-4 week intervals between. Annual boosters are recommended to maintain immunity. For puppies less than 8 weeks talk with your doctor for recommendations.

Bordetella
Bordetella Bronchiseptica is a bacteria implicated as one of the causes of kennel cough. It is a highly contagious disease that is difficult to eradicate with antibiotic treatment. We recommend a series of two shots beginning at 8 weeks of age and then repeated 3-4 weeks later. Annual boosters are generally recommended but for animals often boarded or at great risk of exposure more frequent boosters may be required to maintain protection.

Rabies
Rabies is a fatal infectious neurologic disease passed in the saliva of infected animals. Rabies is a disease that can be passed to owners from their pets. We recommend annual vaccination against this disease starting at 16 weeks of age. Proof of rabies vaccination is required to license your pet.

**Canine distemper, Bordetella and rabies are required for hospitalization at this clinic. Most boarding/grooming facilities also require these vaccinations.**

Lyme
Lyme disease is a tick-borne bacterial disease present in this area that can cause lameness and flu like symptoms. Vaccination helps to prevent infection. Clinical signs of Lyme disease can be treated with antibiotics, but infection may persist to cause chronic problems such as kidney disease. We recommend vaccination for all dogs that may be exposed to ticks while hunting, camping or on walks along the Mississippi river. Vaccination can begin at 9 weeks of age or older with a series of two shots 3-4 weeks apart. Annual boosters are needed to maintain immunity.

Canine Influenza
Canine influenza (H3N2-H3N8) is a highly contagious virus of dogs. Infected dogs typically have a persistent cough, which can last up to one month. Other signs include fever, nasal discharge, and lack of energy. Dogs can be exposed at dog parks, grooming and boarding facilities. The canine influenza vaccine has been shown to reduce the severity of the clinical signs of infection. Initial vaccination consists of two doses 2-4 weeks apart followed by an annual booster.

Vaccine Reactions
Vaccine reactions are uncommon, but occur in about 0.5% of pets. They generally occur within 1-2 hours of vaccines. Most pets experience some lethargy or soreness. Please follow up with a vet if facial swelling, difficulty breathing, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, or profound lethargy occurs.

Heartworm Test
Heartworm disease is caused by a blood parasite spread by mosquitoes. These parasites reproduce in the heart and great vessels and with large numbers can lead to heart failure. Treatment of established heartworm infection has many associated risks. Annual spring testing for heartworm disease with preventative treatment through December 1st is the best way to avoid problems. Heartworm preventative can be given to puppies too young for testing

Intestinal Parasites
Intestinal parasites in puppies and kittens are very common, and can lead to disease in people. For that reason, we recommend two fecal examinations for all new pets, especially puppies and kittens to identify infection. We recommend annual fecal testing in all adult patients or if exhibiting GI signs.

Cat Vaccines

Feline Distemper (FVRCP)
The feline distemper vaccine is a combination of three viral agents that cause contagious respiratory, gastrointestinal and immune suppressive diseases. An initial series of three shots at 3-4 week intervals starting at 8 weeks of age builds immunity. Annual boosters are recommended to maintain protections. If your kitten is less than 8 weeks of age discuss vaccination with your doctor.

Feline Rabies
Rabies is a fatal infectious neurological disease passed in the saliva of infected animals. Rabies is a disease that can be passed to owners from their pets. Proof of rabies vaccination is required to license your pet.

Feline Leukemia (FELV)
Feline leukemia is a retroviral infection that causes chronic immune suppression and neoplastic diseases in the cat. FELV is spread through contact with other cats. Vaccination consists of two shots 3-4 weeks apart starting after 9 weeks of age with annual boosters. Feline leukemia testing is required prior to vaccination.

FELV/FIV Testing
We recommend testing all young kittens and new additions to the household for FIV as well as FELV to ensure that they are not a risk to other cats in the household, or likely to suffer from chronic medical problems that may shorten their life such as a suppressed immune system.

Vaccine Reactions
Vaccine reactions are uncommon, but occur in about 0.5% of pets. They generally occur within 1-2 hours of vaccines. Most pets experience some lethargy or soreness. Please follow up with a vet if facial swelling, difficulty breathing, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, or profound lethargy occurs. Even rarer are injection-site sarcomas. These occur in approximately 1 in 10,000 cats that are genetically predisposed. Please let us know if you find any persistent swellings or masses on your cat.

Intestinal Parasites
Intestinal parasites in puppies and kittens are very common and can lead to disease in people. For that reason, we recommend two fecal examinations for all new puppies and kittens to identify infection. We recommend annual fecals in adult patients or anytime they are exhibiting GI symptoms.

Feline Heartworm Disease
Heartworm disease in cats is much less common than in dogs. The smallest of heartworm burdens in the cat can have severe medical consequences resulting in death. At this time there is not safe treatment for heartworm disease in the cat. Preventative medications are currently available to combat this potentially fatal disease. Heartworm testing is available to evaluate your cat’s risk.

External Parasites
Fleas/mites can infect cats of any age and lifestyle—even indoor cats. Fleas can make a pet very uncomfortable and are frustrating to get rid of once in the bedding and carpeting of a home. Monthly topical preventatives are available to prevent infestations.

Microchip
A microchip is a permanent identification chip about the size of a grain of rice that is placed under the skin of a pet. It reads a unique number that can be registered to you. If your pet gets lost, shelters or clinics can scan the chip, find the unique number, and track it to your contact information in order to reunite you with your pet